Thursday, February 7, 2013

Tamazightinou: So Close, So Far Away: Why Glasses-Free 3D Is Stil...

Tamazightinou: So Close, So Far Away: Why Glasses-Free 3D Is Stil...: The promise is as straightforward as always—3D on your television, minus the glasses Glasses-free 3D, it's a concept that TV-makers hav...

So Close, So Far Away: Why Glasses-Free 3D Is Still a Fantasy


The promise is as straightforward as always—3D on your television, minus the glasses Glasses-free 3D, it's a concept that TV-makers have demoed at previous years' Consumer Electronics Shows, but a full-size, market-ready device has never been unveiled or announced. At a press conference here at the Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas, Philadelphia-based Stream TV showed off what might be remarkable: a glasses-free 3D panel that the company says could show up this year, with compatible content from one of a number of partner providers. glasses-free-3d-0113-mdnThe optimal experience, says Stream, is to use one of their so-called "Ultra-D" displays, with twice the resolution of a standard hi-def TV (or 2160p). But since Stream doesn't sell to customers, but rather to device makers and service providers, it's flexible. The company will happily convert regular HD feeds to 3D, and do its best to display the results on just about any flatscreen. They'll even provide a remote-control-based slider, so you can adjust the intensity of said 3D on the fly. In other words, Streams wants you to have 3D any way you can manage it, and without relying on 3D Blu-ray discs or all-3D cable and satellite channels that leave much, or maybe everything, to be desired. Stream waves its magic algorithms at standard content, and it gains another dimension. And it will eventually work with everything from the Xbox to monitors to tablets and smartphones. For the finale of the press conference, attendants were asked to line up in small groups, no closer than two meters from the demonstration TV (a Sharp panel using Stream's 2160p display technology). The video feed ranged from all-CGI landscapes and renders of the International Space Station, to promotional footage shot for the London Olympics. None of it was captured with dual, stereoscopic 3D cameras. It was all being converted. lg-smart-tvAnd it all looked bad. In the same closeup shot of a gymnast's hands on the pommel horse, fingers and knuckles might be convincingly 3D, but anything hazy, such as the chalked-up handle, would pop outward, swimming far closer than intended. The landscape shots were particularly brutal—while mountains in the foreground had proper depth, the cloud-topped, out-of-focus peaks in the background would jam forward. It was the same with buildings towards the back of a cityscape, or even the receding staircase behind a statue of the Buddha. This isn't a unique phenomenon. In my experience, it happens pretty often with 3D televisions, whenever the signal isn't particularly clean—like when you're watching a 3D movie on demand, instead of on Blu-ray—or when you set the TV to convert 2D footage to 3D. And it's always the same kind of image that misfires, one where, lacking the proper amount of information, the TV turns what might be smoke, or a softer focus, or anything that's pixellated, into the most alarming, inverted sort of 3D artifact, pushing what's often a background element into the foreground. Which is all to say that, despite Stream's claims that its proprietary conversion algorithms and 2160p resolution displays have dispensed with glasses, their demo proved otherwise. 3D TV is a testy, unforgiving technology, requiring perfect conditions to be anything other than nauseating. Stream's Ultra D approach seems to bring the industry closer than ever to a simpler, glasses-free 3D experience. This is progress, compared to past attempts. But the finish line—when 3D at home will be as painless as 2D—is still somewhere ahead, as hazy and indistinct as ever.

Tamazightinou: Learn How to Unlock Factory Locked Phone

Tamazightinou: Learn How to Unlock Factory Locked Phone: There is although an unlimited list of the cell phones in the market that people are picking according to their needs. Some buy those of ...

Learn How to Unlock Factory Locked Phone

         There is although an unlimited list of the cell phones in the market that people are picking according to their needs. Some buy those of the latest and expensive phones and some prefer to have a cheap phone with all the latest phone’s features. But there are still some who want to have expensive phones in the cheaper rates. There are many possible ways to do so. If you live in countries like America, Australia or UK then you can avail the great deals offered by the Telecom companies. But those living outside of these countries have to find out the alternative ways to get some of the expensive phones. The phones are locked for the telecom customer only living in UK, USA and Australia and they are to be unlocked to use them out of those countries. If you search out for the ways to unlock your phone, you will find many online. Following the instructions properly you can achieve your goals. If the SIM card of your country does not work with the phone you just gifted from abroad or you bought it yourself then there is an easier solution for this problem. You can have your SIM inserted to i-smartsim card unlock attachment first and then insert it into the SIM slot. This way your SIM will be able to work with any of the phone you have from all over the world. The good news is that it is compatible with almost all of the phone brands in the market such as LG, iPhone, Nokia, Toshiba, Panasonic, Samsung, Motorola, Huawei, BlackBerry, Vodaphone, Sony Ericsson, ZTE, MDA, Forma and so on. to have the whole list of the phones with which this i-smartsim works you can visit i-smartsim card unlock attachment. It is specially designed to unlock the phones locked by the operators. You just slide the SIM card you have over the i-smartsim and use it like a normal SIM card. It is ultra slim and is equal to regular sized SIM card so you do not need to cut your SIM in most of the cases. This way like many other fields here technology has brought many changes in the lives of the commoners with improved interfaced items in the market. Every coming day brings you the new and innovative discoveries. So there is not be any of the hesitation when you are to add them up into your life. by Sabeen

Tamazightinou: Tamazight Music( Berber Music) Morocco

Tamazightinou: Tamazight Music( Berber Music) Morocco: Musical/Vocal Styles      Berber music is well-known for its use of folk oral traditions, as well as particular scales and rhythm...

Tamazightinou: Will goal-line technology bring justice to soccer?...

Tamazightinou: Will goal-line technology bring justice to soccer?...: It's not game over for goal line detection technology in soccer as some had feared: the systems wil be tested for another year. Although ...

Will goal-line technology bring justice to soccer?


It's not game over for goal line detection technology in soccer as some had feared: the systems wil be tested for another year. Although none of the technologies tested (see story, below) performed as required, FIFA and the International Football Association Board (IFAB) see enough potential in the offerings to attempt to finesse the technologies until they are match fit. FIFA says in this statement: "The IFAB received a presentation on the Goal Line Technology tests conducted by EMPA between 7-13 February at the Home of FIFA. The IFAB heard that none of the ten companies were successful in meeting the criteria set out by the IFAB Annual Business Meeting on 20 October 2010, and therefore agreed to a further one year testing period." A sporting miscarriage of justice that occurred last summer triggered a series of experiments that could this weekend see soccer (that's football to the rest of the world) change forever. The sport's world governing body, FIFA, is deciding whether to adopt technology that detects whether a ball has crossed the goal line or not. If it goes ahead, it will put soccer on a par with cricket and tennis, which have successfully adopted such technology to settle disputes on which the fate of whole competitions can turn. The event that led to it all was England midfielder Frank Lampard "scoring" a blistering equalising goal in last year's World Cup match with Germany (see picture above) - only to have it disallowed because match officials did not see that the ball had crossed the goal line by a full metre. FIFA president Sepp Blatter publicly apologised for the gross error and the event triggered the International Football Association Board - a conglomeration of FIFA and the four British football associations - to commission experiments into goal line technology (GLT). Some 10 companies have entered tests undertaken by the Swiss Federal Institute for Materials Research - or EMPA for short. There appear to be two leading ways of performing goal line alerting. One method is typified by the method posited by Hawk-Eye Innovations of Winchester, UK, which proposes using up to six ultra-high-speed video cameras trained on the goal mouth to assess the ball's flightpath. The firm points out that a ball travelling at 96 kilometres per hour (60 mph) moves one metre in each video frame at TV's regular 25 frames per second - so to boost analytical accuracy they shoot at 500 frames per second. In Munich, Germany, a firm called Cairos Technologies (nice animation there, by the way) places a magnetic-field sensing microchip inside the ball. This senses a magnetic field from current-carrying wires buried beneath the goal mouth - and after deciphering by a computer, this radios an encrypted signal to a referee's wrist-worn goal alert gadget. The tests were undertaken during daylight and under floodlights to see if they could cope with the ball being obscured or shadowed from some angles, says a FIFA spokesman. Entrants have had some tough specifications to meet: IFAB wants the goal decision sensed and transmitted to the referee in one second flat. "The indication of whether a goal has been scored must be immediate and automatically confirmed within 1 second," says IFAB in this statement. "It's one second due to the sheer speed of the game. The ball could be at the other end of the pitch - perhaps in the other goal - in 5 or 6 seconds," says a FIFA spokesman. Hawk-Eye Innovations has responded robustly to some claims that this one second rule may be unmeetable - you can read them here. At 1 pm GMT tomorrow, IFAB will announce whether EMPA's experiments with such kit have been successful - see a TV sports news channel near you - and whether it will now press ahead with developing such technology in the world's major soccer leagues. There are few straws in the wind as to how the decision will go: as of Friday lunchtime, firms taking part in the experiments seem to have been placed under a firm FIFA media lockdown.

Tamazightinou: Fully Automated Soccer Game Analysis

Tamazightinou: Fully Automated Soccer Game Analysis: Coaches and analysts currently spend hours in front of a PC screen going through films and analysing the play of individual players duri...

Fully Automated Soccer Game Analysis


Coaches and analysts currently spend hours in front of a PC screen going through films and analysing the play of individual players during football matches. It takes a long time before the players get to see the analyses for themselves. Our tools can fully automate much of the process. This allows us to save time and reduce the amount of data involved,” explains Professor Pål Halvorsen of the University of Oslo. The new solution consists of two systems: Muithu and Bagadus. Muithu is a video-recording system specially designed for sport while Bagadus is an analytics tool integrating a sensor system, soccer analytics annotations and video processing of a video camera array. These systems open the door to new types of video analysis and have drawn substantial international attention. They have been developed at the centre for Information Access Disruptions (iAD), one of 21 centres granted status as a Centre for Research-based Innovation (SFI) by the Research Council of Norway. Processing vast amounts of data The iAD comprises a number of industrial and research partners working in many fields. For the development of sport technology, the Universities of Oslo and Tromsø are collaborating with the Trondheim-based systems development enterprise ZXY Sport Tracking and the Norwegian professional football team, Tromsø Idrettslag. “The centre is studying the accessing of very large amounts of data in general – how we can compile, save, index and make such data available as quickly as possible to a wide number of users. Top-level sport is an interesting field to work with precisely because it generates enormous amounts of data that need to be analysed quickly.” Analytical tools for the manager An innovative group interested in implementing new technology, the football division of the sports club Tromsø Idrettslag has been the test subject for the iAD in 2012. This season the Tromsø club has been using the Muithu system to analyse its matches. “Normally, the entire analysis team would pore over extensive video recordings after the end of a match,” says Professor Dag Johansen of the University of Tromsø. “But Muithu is a tool for the manager. This system makes it possible for him to put aside pen and paper and review action sequences then and there on his mobile phone without this affecting his coaching responsibilities.” When the manager presses a key on his mobile phone he sets what is to become the end point of a recorded sequence. Muithu automatically retrieves the previous 15 seconds of footage from six different cameras. Dedicated social network “After a match or practice all the video footage selected by the manager is ready for access from the office, eliminating hours of searching through recordings afterwards. Experience indicates that the video recorded is cut down to just five per cent of the former amount,” explains Dr Johansen. Using entirely new electronic solutions, soccer (also known as football in many European countries) coaches can provide their players with video analysis as early as half-time or immediately following a match. One very important aspect of the system is that a completely new social network has been developed, allowing the manager to send players video clips from matches or practice sessions and discuss specific situations in a dedicated discussion forum. The sensors follow the playersAs an extension of the Muithu solution, the iAD has developed the Bagadus system, which combines data from Muithu with a sensor system developed by ZXY Sport Tracking. The setup is based on sensors attached to belts worn by the players. The sensors continually provide various data such as a player’s position on the field. “We have integrated the two systems with an array of cameras covering the entire pitch and all players at all times. This makes it possible, for instance, to select and zoom in on all situations where a certain player is within the opponent’s penalty area,” Dr Halvorsen points out. The system delivers a video summary of the selected events in under a second. Using traditional methods it could take hours to achieve the same result. “The potential of this integration of systems is enormous - and exciting. We envision a scenario in which supporters would be able to search for their favourite players and follow them throughout an entire match, for example, or they could obtain specific video clips they wish to review afterwards,” concludes Dr Halvorsen.

Tamazightinou


http://astore.amazon.com/lahsupsto-20

Tamazightinou: Moroccan Gastronomy

Tamazightinou: Moroccan Gastronomy: Country’s cuisine is influenced by the Africans, Arabs, Berber, Jews, Middle Eastern, and Mediterranean flavors , and Moorish. Moroc...

Tamazightinou: Tamazightinou: Moroccan Gastronomy

Tamazightinou: Tamazightinou: Moroccan Gastronomy: Tamazightinou: Moroccan Gastronomy : Country’s cuisine is influenced by the Africans, Arabs, Berber, Jews, Middle Eastern, and Mediterran...

Tamazightinou: Tamazightinou: Moroccan Gastronomy

Tamazightinou: Tamazightinou: Moroccan Gastronomy: Tamazightinou: Moroccan Gastronomy : Country’s cuisine is influenced by the Africans, Arabs, Berber, Jews, Middle Eastern, and Mediterran...

Wednesday, February 6, 2013

Tamazightinou: Moroccan Gastronomy

Tamazightinou: Moroccan Gastronomy: Country’s cuisine is influenced by the Africans, Arabs, Berber, Jews, Middle Eastern, and Mediterranean flavors , and Moorish. Moroc...Shop Amazon - Valentine's Day Event

Tamazightinou: Moroccan Gastronomy

Tamazightinou: Moroccan Gastronomy: Country’s cuisine is influenced by the Africans, Arabs, Berber, Jews, Middle Eastern, and Mediterranean flavors , and Moorish. Moroc...

Moroccan Gastronomy

Country’s cuisine is influenced by the Africans, Arabs, Berber, Jews, Middle Eastern, and Mediterranean flavors , and Moorish. Morocco produces a huge range of Mediterranean vegetables, fruits and also cattle, seafood, sheep and poultry as base for their cuisine. TagineMost common spices that give flavor to the food are anise seed (used in cookies and breads), cumin (most flavored spice and usually used in chicken, lamb and meats), ginge (used in several stews), paprika (used in vegetable and tomato dishes), sesame seed (usually used in desserts and breads) and turmeric (usually used in harira soup).

Sweentend Somolina

          The national dish of the country is couscous, which is served with vegetables and meat. It is one of the most recognized North African dishes worldwide. Couscouss with vegetabales and meat      Other well-known Moroccan dishes are boulfaf (cooked with garlic, calf liver and lamb crépine), ferakh maamer (cooked with chicken), harira (soup), kefta (prepared with meatballs), khlea (preserved meat with egg), mechoui (roasted lamp), pastilla (cooked with chicken, seafood and almonds), tajine (prepared with meat and vegetable), and tanjia (preserved lemons and red meat).
        Seasonal fruits are usually served at the last part of meals. Common desserts are kaab el ghzal (a pastry with almond paste and sugar on topped), rice pudding (prepared with milk, rice and orange blossom water), limun bel-qerfa (oranges/cinnamon), sellu (roasted flour with butter, almonds, cinnamon, honey), shebakia (fried "cookie" bread dipped in sesame seeds and honey) and zucre coco (coconut fudge cakes).

       The common beverages found in the country are beet juice (orange blossom water and beets), grape juice (white grapes), green tea (tea/mint), 'Asseer Limun (orange juice) and 'Asseer Rumman (orange blossom water/ pomegranate).

http://www.atlas-arganoil.blogspot.com/

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Moroccan Couscouss

  Couscous With Vegetables and Lamb 

 Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 pounds lamb shoulder, neck or shanks with bones, cut in chunks
  • 2 large onions, cut in eighths
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 4 tablespoons butter or olive oil, or a combination
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 17 cups cold water
  • 2 ripe tomatoes, peeled and quartered (canned tomatoes may be substituted)
  • Large pinch saffron
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper (or to taste)
  • 4 cups couscous (about 1 1/2 pounds)
  • 3 medium white turnips, peeled and quartered
  • 4 large carrots, peeled and cut in 3-inch lengths
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 2 large sprigs Italian parsley
  • 2 large sprigs fresh coriander
  • 4 medium-size zucchini
  • 1 pound fresh pumpkin, in 2-inch chunks
  • 1 1-pound can chick peas, drained
  • Hot pepper sauce (optional)

Preparation

1.
Place the lamb, onion, ginger and turmeric in the bottom of a couscoussier or a large pot that can be fitted with a steamer. Add the butter or oil, season with salt and pepper and cook over medium heat about 5 minutes, stirring from time to time.
2.
Add 12 cups water, the tomatoes, saffron, cinnamon sticks and cayenne pepper. Bring to a simmer and cook, covered, for an hour.
3.
While the lamb mixture is cooking, place the couscous in a bowl. Gradually stir in 4 cups water, then drain. Spread the moistened couscous in a large flat pan or dish with sides. Allow the moist couscous to sit 10 to 15 minutes, then break up any lumps with a fork or your fingers.
4.
Remove the lid from the couscoussier or pot and place the perforated section or the steamer on top. Take a length of cheesecloth or other cloth, moisten it and fit it tightly around the seam between the two parts of the pot, to prevent steam from escaping. Spoon half the couscous into the top section and when the steam starts rising through it, add the remaining couscous. Steam, uncovered, for 15 minutes.
5.
Remove the top of the couscoussier and replace the cover on the bottom pot. Dump the steamed couscous back into the flat pan. Allow it to cool a few minutes, then gradually sprinkle it with a cup of cold water and season it with about 1/2 teaspoon salt, or to taste. Using your fingers, gently work the couscous to break up any lumps. Spread it evenly and allow it dry for up to an hour.
6.
Add the turnips, carrots and raisins to the pot. Tie the parsley and coriander together, and add them. Simmer, covered, for 45 minutes.
7.
After about 2 hours' cooking, the lamb should be tender. Cut the zucchini in half crosswise and cut each piece in half lengthwise. Add the zucchini to the pot, and follow with the pumpkin. Drain the chick peas, and add them. Check the seasonings in the pot. If necessary, add a little more water, enough to keep the ingredients covered with liquid.
8.
Replace the steamer top on the pot and wrap it again with the cloth. Rake the couscous once more, then return half of it to the steamer. When the steam begins to rise, add the remaining couscous. Steam, uncovered, 15 minutes. The couscous should be light, fluffy and tender.
9.
To serve, spoon half the couscous onto a large round platter. Make a well in the center. With a slotted spoon remove the pieces of lamb from the pot and pile them in the center. Top them with some of the vegetables. Mound the rest of the couscous over these ingredients. Then, place the remaining vegetables around the couscous and on top of it. Discard the parsley and coriander.
10.
Reheat the broth briefly, and spoon it into 1 or 2 bowls. Serve the couscous with the broth on the side and, if desired, hot pepper sauce.

Moroccan Gastronomy( Tagine)

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Moroccan Tagine
  "Tagines are Moroccan slow-cooked meat, fruit and vegetable dishes which are almost invariably made with mutton. Using lamb cuts down the cooking time, but if you can find good hogget (older than lamb, younger than mutton, commonly labeled 'baking legs' and sold cheaply) that will do very well." 

  Ingredients:

Directions

  1. Heat the oil in a large pot or Dutch oven over medium heat. Fry the onion in the oil until soft. Add the lamb meat to the pan, and fry until just browned on the outside. Season with cumin, coriander, ginger, cinnamon, salt and pepper. Pour just enough water into the pot to cover the meat. Cover, and simmer over low heat for 1 1/2 to 2 hours, until meat is tender and the mixture is stew-like. Displace lid a little after an hour if there appears to be too much liquid.
  2. Add the pears, golden raisins and almonds to the stew, and cook for another 5 minutes or so, until the pears are soft. Serve with rice.

Moroccan Gastronomy

<Shop Amazon - Cookbooks, Food div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"> "A delicious chicken pie with a subtle difference - found on my travels in the Middle East and North Africa. Makes a good buffet dish. Make sure bouillon is strongly flavored." 
 B'stilla:

   Ingredients:



     
Original recipe makes 4 servings Change Servings
   

Tuesday, February 5, 2013